5 Reads for Bad Mental Health Days

 

I’ve found that over the last few years, a few titles keep cropping up when I go to pick up a book to help me along on bad days. Although only some of these are directly about depression, I’ve found each to be uplifting and hopeful in its own way.

 

  1. The Humans by Matt Haigh

I’ve poured over this book so many times, and although, yes, it is about an alien disguised as an Oxford Professor, it contains beautifully constructed musings on finding the good and happy in humanity as it is. The story, complete with a physical list of ‘life lessons’ at the end, is a wonderful quick pick me up and completely restores my faith in life.

 

2. It’s Kind of A Funny Story by Ned Vizzini

This book is part novel, part memoir, about a boy’s experience with being admitted to a mental health facility after he calls a suicide helpline. What I find best about this book is that it effectively begins with identifying the problem and the depression sufferer seeking out help – something that is surprisingly quite refreshing in books of this kind. This book explores coping mechanisms, dealing with stereotypes of mental illness sufferers, and a few ‘coming of age’ elements, and I always come out the other side of this read feeling that much more hopeful.

 

3. The Perks of Being A Wallflower

As I tend to feel quite isolated during a down patch, this is the best book to make me feel appreciative of friends and always finds a way to give me a new perspective through which to view the everyday. Besides having a neuro-atypical protagonist, this novel indirectly deals with larger issues of abuse, lonliness, family, friendship, and love, which in the end resolve in not necessarily a positive way, but in a wistful and hopeful one, with a look towards the future.

 

4. Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

Although this book of poetry is a difficult read due to the content of the first half – rape, extreme negative body image, and vivid descriptions of depressive episodes – the contrast with Kaur’s end point of positivity and love is a fantastic illustration of recovery and how life can always improve and emotional hardship overcome.

 

5. Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig

Yes, Matt Haig is on here again, but this time with this non-fiction/memoir book about his own experiences with depression and anxiety. Anecdotes and essays interspersed with facts and figures about mental health, this book is a must read for practically everyone. Haig shares his own ways of coping, his own journey through relapses into severe depressive episodes, from where he draws strength and inspiration, and many, many words of comfort.

 

Have any of you read these books? What would you recommend or would you read during a bad mental health day?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s