November ’16 Wrap Up

Books Bought

  • The Masked City, Genevieve Cogman
  • Songs, Robert Burns
  • Angela Carters Book of Fairy Tales, Angela Carter
  • Poems for Life, Various Authors

 

Books Read

  • The Hag Seed, Margaret Atwood
  • Yes Please, Amy Poehler

 

It’s been a pretty quiet month, reading and buying-wise – most of this month has been spend desperately scribbling sub-par essays, Christmas shopping and sorting our trip up to Edinburgh (photos and possibly a bookshop tour to come?) so I’m feeling a little behind. Although, as I type this I’m a good way through Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo, which I think I’ll finish just too late to include in this wrap-up.

As for the books I’ve bought, I have imposed somewhat of a flexible buying ban on myself for the time being. I’m finding it far too easy to clutter up my bookshelves with exciting new releases, even though I have far too many unread books that at one point were themselves very exciting, then I get stressed because I don’t know what to read, and then I read nothing at all. A perfect circle of uselessness. That being said, I do have explanations for the books I bought, I swear.

The Masked City is the sequel to a book I already own, The Invisible Library, which I am very excited to read and is at the top of my 2017 TBR. I found the second book in a charity shop for only £2, and knowing that I had the first book lined up my friend convinced me that I was saving money in the long run, given that I fully intended to read it. Poems for Life, which I bought from the same charity shop, was entirely my own doing, on the other hand – it’s a beautiful forrest green clothbound collection of poetry, split into life events to which they’re most relevant. Not only is it just a gorgeous anthology to have on my shelf, but it was only £3 (*insert Say No To This lyrics here*).

Angela Carter’s Book of Fairy Tales was also a defendable purchase; Matt and I had our first weekend away together in Edinburgh, and, true to form I spent the majority of it scouting out independent bookshops. The first of which was Transreal Fiction, a shop that specialises in sci-fi and fantasy titles, and when I saw this book poking out of one of the shelves I knew this was a god chance to buy it. I’ve been lusting after it in Waterstones for years, but this way I’ve supported an indie bookseller and gotten a great momento. Right?

Robbie Burns book of Songs was another buy from Edinburgh, an absolute bargain found in a secondhand bookshop. It’s a very old edition – it doesn’t actually have a date or edition on it, just the publishing house, so I may do some investigating – and for all the stereotyping it’s going to be something that always reminds me of our trip up to Scotland. It’s also a handy reference for remembering the words to Auld Lang Syne when I’m drunk at New Years.

Finally, on to the books I’ve actually finished this month: Yes Please was a little disappointing, so I won’t dwell on it for too long, but ultimately it wasn’t that funny or interesting to me, and considering I love Amy Poehler and it had been strongly recommended to me by various people it just fell a little flat. Sorry, Amy.

The Hag Seed, on the other hand, was absolutely incredible. This was Margaret Atwood’s retelling of The Tempest for the Hogarth Shakespeare series, which I was lucky enough to get a signed copy of when I went to her talk about the inspirations for the book. It’s about a disgraced theatre director who now works in a prison, getting convicts to perform Shakespeare and getting them to fully engage with the literature and the themes. Not only does The Tempest itself appear multiple times in its original form as a play within this book, but the narrative itself holds parallels, references, and themes with the source material too. It’s funny and dark and elegantly composed, and completely makes up for my otherwise barren month of reading.

What have you all read this month that you’ve enjoyed? And which books have you been buying? Let me know down in the comments!

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